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To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed 0,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to

To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

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To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

The explanatory statement regarding this Act, printed in the House section of the Congressional Record on or about March 22, 2018, and submitted by the Chairman of the Committee on Appropriations of the House, shall have the same effect with respect to the allocation of funds and implementation of divisions A through L of this Act as if it were a joint explanatory statement of a committee of conference. App.) and section 1337 of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981 (Public Law 97–98). For necessary expenses of the Agricultural Research Service and for acquisition of lands by donation, exchange, or purchase at a nominal cost not to exceed $100, and for land exchanges where the lands exchanged shall be of equal value or shall be equalized by a payment of money to the grantor which shall not exceed 25 percent of the total value of the land or interests transferred out of Federal ownership, $1,202,766,000: Provided, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed one for replacement only: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available pursuant to 7 U. For payments to agricultural experiment stations, for cooperative forestry and other research, for facilities, and for other expenses, $887,171,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Research and Education Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for research grants for 1994 institutions, education grants for 1890 institutions, capacity building for non-land-grant colleges of agriculture, the agriculture and food research initiative, veterinary medicine loan repayment, multicultural scholars, graduate fellowship and institution challenge grants, and grants management systems shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That each institution eligible to receive funds under the Evans-Allen program receives no less than $1,000,000: Provided further, That funds for education grants for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions be made available to individual eligible institutions or consortia of eligible institutions with funds awarded equally to each of the States of Alaska and Hawaii: Provided further, That funds for education grants for 1890 institutions shall be made available to institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $161,571,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 20101), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $35,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,500,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $40,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $90,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $48,000,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; and (2) $42,000,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention. 50101); (2) $240,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $24,800,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 10381) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (34 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses. 527 note) shall be available for obligation in fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

For expenses necessary for the administration of immigration-related activities of the Executive Office for Immigration Review, $504,500,000, of which $4,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from the Executive Office for Immigration Review fees deposited in the “Immigration Examinations Fee” account: Provided, That not to exceed $35,000,000 of the total amount made available under this heading shall remain available until expended.

,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed

To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

||

To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

The explanatory statement regarding this Act, printed in the House section of the Congressional Record on or about March 22, 2018, and submitted by the Chairman of the Committee on Appropriations of the House, shall have the same effect with respect to the allocation of funds and implementation of divisions A through L of this Act as if it were a joint explanatory statement of a committee of conference. App.) and section 1337 of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981 (Public Law 97–98). For necessary expenses of the Agricultural Research Service and for acquisition of lands by donation, exchange, or purchase at a nominal cost not to exceed $100, and for land exchanges where the lands exchanged shall be of equal value or shall be equalized by a payment of money to the grantor which shall not exceed 25 percent of the total value of the land or interests transferred out of Federal ownership, $1,202,766,000: Provided, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed one for replacement only: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available pursuant to 7 U. For payments to agricultural experiment stations, for cooperative forestry and other research, for facilities, and for other expenses, $887,171,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Research and Education Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for research grants for 1994 institutions, education grants for 1890 institutions, capacity building for non-land-grant colleges of agriculture, the agriculture and food research initiative, veterinary medicine loan repayment, multicultural scholars, graduate fellowship and institution challenge grants, and grants management systems shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That each institution eligible to receive funds under the Evans-Allen program receives no less than $1,000,000: Provided further, That funds for education grants for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions be made available to individual eligible institutions or consortia of eligible institutions with funds awarded equally to each of the States of Alaska and Hawaii: Provided further, That funds for education grants for 1890 institutions shall be made available to institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $161,571,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 20101), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $35,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,500,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $40,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $90,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $48,000,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; and (2) $42,000,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention. 50101); (2) $240,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $24,800,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 10381) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (34 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses. 527 note) shall be available for obligation in fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

For expenses necessary for the administration of immigration-related activities of the Executive Office for Immigration Review, $504,500,000, of which $4,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from the Executive Office for Immigration Review fees deposited in the “Immigration Examinations Fee” account: Provided, That not to exceed $35,000,000 of the total amount made available under this heading shall remain available until expended.

,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed ,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or 0,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, 0,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, 3,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, ,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed ,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed ,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed ,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) ,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) ,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) ,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) ,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) ,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That

To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

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To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

The explanatory statement regarding this Act, printed in the House section of the Congressional Record on or about March 22, 2018, and submitted by the Chairman of the Committee on Appropriations of the House, shall have the same effect with respect to the allocation of funds and implementation of divisions A through L of this Act as if it were a joint explanatory statement of a committee of conference. App.) and section 1337 of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981 (Public Law 97–98). For necessary expenses of the Agricultural Research Service and for acquisition of lands by donation, exchange, or purchase at a nominal cost not to exceed $100, and for land exchanges where the lands exchanged shall be of equal value or shall be equalized by a payment of money to the grantor which shall not exceed 25 percent of the total value of the land or interests transferred out of Federal ownership, $1,202,766,000: Provided, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed one for replacement only: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available pursuant to 7 U. For payments to agricultural experiment stations, for cooperative forestry and other research, for facilities, and for other expenses, $887,171,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Research and Education Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for research grants for 1994 institutions, education grants for 1890 institutions, capacity building for non-land-grant colleges of agriculture, the agriculture and food research initiative, veterinary medicine loan repayment, multicultural scholars, graduate fellowship and institution challenge grants, and grants management systems shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That each institution eligible to receive funds under the Evans-Allen program receives no less than $1,000,000: Provided further, That funds for education grants for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions be made available to individual eligible institutions or consortia of eligible institutions with funds awarded equally to each of the States of Alaska and Hawaii: Provided further, That funds for education grants for 1890 institutions shall be made available to institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $161,571,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 20101), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $35,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,500,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $40,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $90,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $48,000,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; and (2) $42,000,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention. 50101); (2) $240,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $24,800,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 10381) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (34 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses. 527 note) shall be available for obligation in fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

For expenses necessary for the administration of immigration-related activities of the Executive Office for Immigration Review, $504,500,000, of which $4,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from the Executive Office for Immigration Review fees deposited in the “Immigration Examinations Fee” account: Provided, That not to exceed $35,000,000 of the total amount made available under this heading shall remain available until expended.

,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8)

To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

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To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

The explanatory statement regarding this Act, printed in the House section of the Congressional Record on or about March 22, 2018, and submitted by the Chairman of the Committee on Appropriations of the House, shall have the same effect with respect to the allocation of funds and implementation of divisions A through L of this Act as if it were a joint explanatory statement of a committee of conference. App.) and section 1337 of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981 (Public Law 97–98). For necessary expenses of the Agricultural Research Service and for acquisition of lands by donation, exchange, or purchase at a nominal cost not to exceed $100, and for land exchanges where the lands exchanged shall be of equal value or shall be equalized by a payment of money to the grantor which shall not exceed 25 percent of the total value of the land or interests transferred out of Federal ownership, $1,202,766,000: Provided, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed one for replacement only: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available pursuant to 7 U. For payments to agricultural experiment stations, for cooperative forestry and other research, for facilities, and for other expenses, $887,171,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Research and Education Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for research grants for 1994 institutions, education grants for 1890 institutions, capacity building for non-land-grant colleges of agriculture, the agriculture and food research initiative, veterinary medicine loan repayment, multicultural scholars, graduate fellowship and institution challenge grants, and grants management systems shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That each institution eligible to receive funds under the Evans-Allen program receives no less than $1,000,000: Provided further, That funds for education grants for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions be made available to individual eligible institutions or consortia of eligible institutions with funds awarded equally to each of the States of Alaska and Hawaii: Provided further, That funds for education grants for 1890 institutions shall be made available to institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $161,571,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 20101), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $35,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,500,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $40,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $90,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $48,000,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; and (2) $42,000,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention. 50101); (2) $240,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $24,800,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 10381) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (34 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses. 527 note) shall be available for obligation in fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

For expenses necessary for the administration of immigration-related activities of the Executive Office for Immigration Review, $504,500,000, of which $4,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from the Executive Office for Immigration Review fees deposited in the “Immigration Examinations Fee” account: Provided, That not to exceed $35,000,000 of the total amount made available under this heading shall remain available until expended.

,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) ,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than ,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) ,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) 0,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) 0,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) ,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) ,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) ,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) ,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) ,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) ,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed ,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, ,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and ,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to ,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to ,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) ,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) ,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which ,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, ,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and ,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) 0,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) ,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) ,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) ,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) ,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) ,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) 5,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, 2,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) ,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, 0,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) ,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) ,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) ,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) ,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) 0,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) ,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) ,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) ,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) ,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) ,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) ,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) ,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed 5,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, ,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, ,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph ,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) ,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) ,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) ,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

The explanatory statement regarding this Act, printed in the House section of the Congressional Record on or about March 22, 2018, and submitted by the Chairman of the Committee on Appropriations of the House, shall have the same effect with respect to the allocation of funds and implementation of divisions A through L of this Act as if it were a joint explanatory statement of a committee of conference. App.) and section 1337 of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981 (Public Law 97–98). For necessary expenses of the Agricultural Research Service and for acquisition of lands by donation, exchange, or purchase at a nominal cost not to exceed 0, and for land exchanges where the lands exchanged shall be of equal value or shall be equalized by a payment of money to the grantor which shall not exceed 25 percent of the total value of the land or interests transferred out of Federal ownership,

To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

||

To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

The explanatory statement regarding this Act, printed in the House section of the Congressional Record on or about March 22, 2018, and submitted by the Chairman of the Committee on Appropriations of the House, shall have the same effect with respect to the allocation of funds and implementation of divisions A through L of this Act as if it were a joint explanatory statement of a committee of conference. App.) and section 1337 of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981 (Public Law 97–98). For necessary expenses of the Agricultural Research Service and for acquisition of lands by donation, exchange, or purchase at a nominal cost not to exceed $100, and for land exchanges where the lands exchanged shall be of equal value or shall be equalized by a payment of money to the grantor which shall not exceed 25 percent of the total value of the land or interests transferred out of Federal ownership, $1,202,766,000: Provided, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed one for replacement only: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available pursuant to 7 U. For payments to agricultural experiment stations, for cooperative forestry and other research, for facilities, and for other expenses, $887,171,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Research and Education Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for research grants for 1994 institutions, education grants for 1890 institutions, capacity building for non-land-grant colleges of agriculture, the agriculture and food research initiative, veterinary medicine loan repayment, multicultural scholars, graduate fellowship and institution challenge grants, and grants management systems shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That each institution eligible to receive funds under the Evans-Allen program receives no less than $1,000,000: Provided further, That funds for education grants for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions be made available to individual eligible institutions or consortia of eligible institutions with funds awarded equally to each of the States of Alaska and Hawaii: Provided further, That funds for education grants for 1890 institutions shall be made available to institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $161,571,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 20101), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $35,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,500,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $40,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $90,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $48,000,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; and (2) $42,000,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention. 50101); (2) $240,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $24,800,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 10381) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (34 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses. 527 note) shall be available for obligation in fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

For expenses necessary for the administration of immigration-related activities of the Executive Office for Immigration Review, $504,500,000, of which $4,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from the Executive Office for Immigration Review fees deposited in the “Immigration Examinations Fee” account: Provided, That not to exceed $35,000,000 of the total amount made available under this heading shall remain available until expended.

,202,766,000: Provided, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed one for replacement only: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available pursuant to 7 U. For payments to agricultural experiment stations, for cooperative forestry and other research, for facilities, and for other expenses, 7,171,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Research and Education Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for research grants for 1994 institutions, education grants for 1890 institutions, capacity building for non-land-grant colleges of agriculture, the agriculture and food research initiative, veterinary medicine loan repayment, multicultural scholars, graduate fellowship and institution challenge grants, and grants management systems shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That each institution eligible to receive funds under the Evans-Allen program receives no less than

To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

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To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

The explanatory statement regarding this Act, printed in the House section of the Congressional Record on or about March 22, 2018, and submitted by the Chairman of the Committee on Appropriations of the House, shall have the same effect with respect to the allocation of funds and implementation of divisions A through L of this Act as if it were a joint explanatory statement of a committee of conference. App.) and section 1337 of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981 (Public Law 97–98). For necessary expenses of the Agricultural Research Service and for acquisition of lands by donation, exchange, or purchase at a nominal cost not to exceed $100, and for land exchanges where the lands exchanged shall be of equal value or shall be equalized by a payment of money to the grantor which shall not exceed 25 percent of the total value of the land or interests transferred out of Federal ownership, $1,202,766,000: Provided, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed one for replacement only: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available pursuant to 7 U. For payments to agricultural experiment stations, for cooperative forestry and other research, for facilities, and for other expenses, $887,171,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Research and Education Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for research grants for 1994 institutions, education grants for 1890 institutions, capacity building for non-land-grant colleges of agriculture, the agriculture and food research initiative, veterinary medicine loan repayment, multicultural scholars, graduate fellowship and institution challenge grants, and grants management systems shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That each institution eligible to receive funds under the Evans-Allen program receives no less than $1,000,000: Provided further, That funds for education grants for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions be made available to individual eligible institutions or consortia of eligible institutions with funds awarded equally to each of the States of Alaska and Hawaii: Provided further, That funds for education grants for 1890 institutions shall be made available to institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $161,571,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 20101), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $35,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,500,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $40,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $90,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $48,000,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; and (2) $42,000,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention. 50101); (2) $240,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $24,800,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 10381) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (34 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses. 527 note) shall be available for obligation in fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

For expenses necessary for the administration of immigration-related activities of the Executive Office for Immigration Review, $504,500,000, of which $4,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from the Executive Office for Immigration Review fees deposited in the “Immigration Examinations Fee” account: Provided, That not to exceed $35,000,000 of the total amount made available under this heading shall remain available until expended.

,000,000: Provided further, That funds for education grants for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions be made available to individual eligible institutions or consortia of eligible institutions with funds awarded equally to each of the States of Alaska and Hawaii: Provided further, That funds for education grants for 1890 institutions shall be made available to institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, 1,571,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 20101), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) 5,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) ,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) ,500,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) ,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) ,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which ,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) ,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) ,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) ,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) ,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) ,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) ,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) ,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) 0,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14)

To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

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To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

The explanatory statement regarding this Act, printed in the House section of the Congressional Record on or about March 22, 2018, and submitted by the Chairman of the Committee on Appropriations of the House, shall have the same effect with respect to the allocation of funds and implementation of divisions A through L of this Act as if it were a joint explanatory statement of a committee of conference. App.) and section 1337 of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981 (Public Law 97–98). For necessary expenses of the Agricultural Research Service and for acquisition of lands by donation, exchange, or purchase at a nominal cost not to exceed $100, and for land exchanges where the lands exchanged shall be of equal value or shall be equalized by a payment of money to the grantor which shall not exceed 25 percent of the total value of the land or interests transferred out of Federal ownership, $1,202,766,000: Provided, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed one for replacement only: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available pursuant to 7 U. For payments to agricultural experiment stations, for cooperative forestry and other research, for facilities, and for other expenses, $887,171,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Research and Education Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for research grants for 1994 institutions, education grants for 1890 institutions, capacity building for non-land-grant colleges of agriculture, the agriculture and food research initiative, veterinary medicine loan repayment, multicultural scholars, graduate fellowship and institution challenge grants, and grants management systems shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That each institution eligible to receive funds under the Evans-Allen program receives no less than $1,000,000: Provided further, That funds for education grants for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions be made available to individual eligible institutions or consortia of eligible institutions with funds awarded equally to each of the States of Alaska and Hawaii: Provided further, That funds for education grants for 1890 institutions shall be made available to institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $161,571,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 20101), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $35,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,500,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $40,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $90,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $48,000,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; and (2) $42,000,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention. 50101); (2) $240,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $24,800,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 10381) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (34 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses. 527 note) shall be available for obligation in fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

For expenses necessary for the administration of immigration-related activities of the Executive Office for Immigration Review, $504,500,000, of which $4,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from the Executive Office for Immigration Review fees deposited in the “Immigration Examinations Fee” account: Provided, That not to exceed $35,000,000 of the total amount made available under this heading shall remain available until expended.

,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) 0,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) ,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17)

To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

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To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes. 2250 for the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and improvements, but unless otherwise provided, the cost of constructing any one building shall not exceed $500,000, except for headhouses or greenhouses which shall each be limited to $1,800,000, except for 10 buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $1,100,000 each, and except for two buildings to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $3,000,000 each, and the cost of altering any one building during the fiscal year shall not exceed 10 percent of the current replacement value of the building or $500,000, whichever is greater: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for entering into lease agreements at any Agricultural Research Service location for the construction of a research facility by a non-Federal entity for use by the Agricultural Research Service and a condition of the lease shall be that any facility shall be owned, operated, and maintained by the non-Federal entity and shall be removed upon the expiration or termination of the lease agreement: Provided further, That the limitations on alterations contained in this Act shall not apply to modernization or replacement of existing facilities at Beltsville, Maryland: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for granting easements at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Provided further, That the foregoing limitations shall not apply to replacement of buildings needed to carry out the Act of April 24, 1948 (21 U. For the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture, where not otherwise provided, $140,600,000 to remain available until expended. 32: Provided further, That not more than 5 percent of the amounts made available by this or any other Act to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative under 7 U. For payments to States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, Micronesia, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa, $483,626,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Extension Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for facility improvements at 1890 institutions shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Prison System for the administration, operation, and maintenance of Federal penal and correctional institutions, and for the provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections related issues to foreign governments, $7,114,000,000: Provided, That the Attorney General may transfer to the Department of Health and Human Services such amounts as may be necessary for direct expenditures by that Department for medical relief for inmates of Federal penal and correctional institutions: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System, where necessary, may enter into contracts with a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary claims processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who, on behalf of the Federal Prison System, furnish health services to individuals committed to the custody of the Federal Prison System: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,400 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000,000 shall remain available for necessary operations until September 30, 2019: Provided further, That, of the amounts provided for contract confinement, not to exceed $20,000,000 shall remain available until expended to make payments in advance for grants, contracts and reimbursable agreements, and other expenses: Provided further, That the Director of the Federal Prison System may accept donated property and services relating to the operation of the prison card program from a not-for-profit entity which has operated such program in the past, notwithstanding the fact that such not-for-profit entity furnishes services under contracts to the Federal Prison System relating to the operation of pre-release services, halfway houses, or other custodial facilities. 1231(i)(5)): Provided, That no jurisdiction shall request compensation for any cost greater than the actual cost for Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and local detention facilities; (3) $77,000,000 for victim services programs for victims of trafficking, as authorized by section 107(b)(2) of Public Law 106–386, for programs authorized under Public Law 109–164, or programs authorized under Public Law 113–4; (4) $3,000,000 for the Capital Litigation Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 426 of Public Law 108–405, and for grants for wrongful conviction review; (5) $14,000,000 for economic, high technology, white collar and Internet crime prevention grants, including as authorized by section 401 of Public Law 110–403; (6) $20,000,000 for sex offender management assistance, as authorized by the Adam Walsh Act, and related activities; (7) $22,500,000 for the matching grant program for law enforcement armor vests, as authorized by section 2501 of title I of the 1968 Act: Provided, That $1,500,000 is transferred directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Office of Law Enforcement Standards for research, testing and evaluation programs; (8) $1,000,000 for the National Sex Offender Public Website; (9) $75,000,000 for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, of which no less than $25,000,000 shall be for grants made under the authorities of the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); (10) $30,000,000 for Paul Coverdell Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants under part BB of title I of the 1968 Act; (11) $130,000,000 for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, of which— (A) $120,000,000 is for a DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program and for other local, State, and Federal forensic activities, including the purposes authorized under section 2 of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–546) (the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program): Provided, That up to 4 percent of funds made available under this paragraph may be used for the purposes described in the DNA Training and Education for Law Enforcement, Correctional Personnel, and Court Officers program (Public Law 108–405, section 303); (B) $6,000,000 is for the purposes described in the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant Program (Public Law 108–405, section 412); and (C) $4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program grants, including as authorized by section 304 of Public Law 108–405; (12) $47,500,000 for a grant program for community-based sexual assault response reform; (13) $12,000,000 for the court-appointed special advocate program, as authorized by section 217 of the 1990 Act; (14) $35,000,000 for assistance to Indian tribes; (15) $85,000,000 for offender reentry programs and research, as authorized by the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199), without regard to the time limitations specified at section 6(1) of such Act, of which not to exceed $6,000,000 is for a program to improve State, local, and tribal probation or parole supervision efforts and strategies, $5,000,000 is for Children of Incarcerated Parents Demonstrations to enhance and maintain parental and family relationships for incarcerated parents as a reentry or recidivism reduction strategy, and $4,000,000 is for additional replication sites employing the Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement model implementing swift and certain sanctions in probation, and for a research project on the effectiveness of the model: Provided, That up to $7,500,000 of funds made available in this paragraph may be used for performance-based awards for Pay for Success projects, of which up to $5,000,000 shall be for Pay for Success programs implementing the Permanent Supportive Housing Model; (16) $75,000,000 for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative; (17) $65,000,000 for initiatives to improve police-community relations, of which $22,500,000 is for a competitive matching grant program for purchases of body-worn cameras for State, local and tribal law enforcement, $25,000,000 is for a justice reinvestment initiative, for activities related to criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction, and $17,500,000 is for an Edward Byrne Memorial criminal justice innovation program; and (18) $330,000,000 for comprehensive opioid abuse reduction activities, including as authorized by CARA, and for the following programs, which shall address opioid abuse reduction consistent with underlying program authorities— (A) $75,000,000 for Drug Courts, as authorized by section 1001(a)(25)(A) of title I of the 1968 Act; (B) $30,000,000 for mental health courts and adult and juvenile collaboration program grants, as authorized by parts V and HH of title I of the 1968 Act, and the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); (C) $30,000,000 for grants for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners, as authorized by part S of title I of the 1968 Act; (D) $20,000,000 for a veterans treatment courts program; (E) $30,000,000 for a program to monitor prescription drugs and scheduled listed chemical products; and (F) $145,000,000 for a comprehensive opioid abuse program: Provided, That, if a unit of local government uses any of the funds made available under this heading to increase the number of law enforcement officers, the unit of local government will achieve a net gain in the number of law enforcement officers who perform non-administrative public sector safety service. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324); and other juvenile justice programs, $282,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $60,000,000 for programs authorized by section 221 of the 1974 Act, and for training and technical assistance to assist small, nonprofit organizations with the Federal grants process: Provided, That of the amounts provided under this paragraph, $500,000 shall be for a competitive demonstration grant program to support emergency planning among State, local and tribal juvenile justice residential facilities; (2) $94,000,000 for youth mentoring grants; (3) $27,500,000 for delinquency prevention, as authorized by section 505 of the 1974 Act, of which, pursuant to sections 261 and 262 thereof— (A) $5,000,000 shall be for the Tribal Youth Program; (B) $4,000,000 shall be for gang and youth violence education, prevention and intervention, and related activities; (C) $500,000 shall be for an Internet site providing information and resources on children of incarcerated parents; (D) $2,000,000 shall be for competitive grants focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system; (E) $8,000,000 shall be for community-based violence prevention initiatives, including for public health approaches to reducing shootings and violence; and (F) $8,000,000 shall be for an opioid-affected youth initiative; (4) $21,000,000 for programs authorized by the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990; (5) $76,000,000 for missing and exploited children programs, including as authorized by sections 404(b) and 405(a) of the 1974 Act (except that section 102(b)(4)(B) of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401) shall not apply for purposes of this Act); (6) $2,000,000 for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, as authorized by section 222 of the 1990 Act; and (7) $2,000,000 for a program to improve juvenile indigent defense: Provided, That not more than 10 percent of each amount may be used for research, evaluation, and statistics activities designed to benefit the programs or activities authorized: Provided further, That not more than 2 percent of the amounts designated under paragraphs (1) through (3) and (6) may be used for training and technical assistance: Provided further, That the two preceding provisos shall not apply to grants and projects administered pursuant to sections 261 and 262 of the 1974 Act and to missing and exploited children programs. 10384(c)), funding for hiring or rehiring a career law enforcement officer may not exceed $125,000 unless the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services grants a waiver from this limitation: Provided further, That within the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $30,000,000 is for improving tribal law enforcement, including hiring, equipment, training, anti-methamphetamine activities, and anti-opioid activities: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph, $10,000,000 is for community policing development activities in furtherance of the purposes in section 1701: Provided further, That of the amounts appropriated under this paragraph $36,000,000 is for regional information sharing activities, as authorized by part M of title I of the 1968 Act, which shall be transferred to and merged with “Research, Evaluation, and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (2) $10,000,000 is for activities authorized by the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–199); (3) $8,000,000 is for competitive grants to State law enforcement agencies in States with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures: Provided, That funds appropriated under this paragraph shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers; and (4) $32,000,000 is for competitive grants to statewide law enforcement agencies in States with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids: Provided, That these funds shall be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration.

The explanatory statement regarding this Act, printed in the House section of the Congressional Record on or about March 22, 2018, and submitted by the Chairman of the Committee on Appropriations of the House, shall have the same effect with respect to the allocation of funds and implementation of divisions A through L of this Act as if it were a joint explanatory statement of a committee of conference. App.) and section 1337 of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981 (Public Law 97–98). For necessary expenses of the Agricultural Research Service and for acquisition of lands by donation, exchange, or purchase at a nominal cost not to exceed $100, and for land exchanges where the lands exchanged shall be of equal value or shall be equalized by a payment of money to the grantor which shall not exceed 25 percent of the total value of the land or interests transferred out of Federal ownership, $1,202,766,000: Provided, That appropriations hereunder shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed one for replacement only: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available pursuant to 7 U. For payments to agricultural experiment stations, for cooperative forestry and other research, for facilities, and for other expenses, $887,171,000, which shall be for the purposes, and in the amounts, specified in the table titled “National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Research and Education Activities” in the explanatory statement described in section 4 (in the matter preceding division A of this consolidated Act): Provided, That funds for research grants for 1994 institutions, education grants for 1890 institutions, capacity building for non-land-grant colleges of agriculture, the agriculture and food research initiative, veterinary medicine loan repayment, multicultural scholars, graduate fellowship and institution challenge grants, and grants management systems shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That each institution eligible to receive funds under the Evans-Allen program receives no less than $1,000,000: Provided further, That funds for education grants for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions be made available to individual eligible institutions or consortia of eligible institutions with funds awarded equally to each of the States of Alaska and Hawaii: Provided further, That funds for education grants for 1890 institutions shall be made available to institutions eligible to receive funds under 7 U. For planning, acquisition of sites and construction of new facilities; purchase and acquisition of facilities and remodeling, and equipping of such facilities for penal and correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account; and constructing, remodeling, and equipping necessary buildings and facilities at existing penal and correctional institutions, including all necessary expenses incident thereto, by contract or force account, $161,571,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That labor of United States prisoners may be used for work performed under this appropriation. 20101), notwithstanding section 1402(d) of such Act of 1984, and merged with the amounts otherwise made available under this heading: Provided, That except as otherwise provided by law, not to exceed 5 percent of funds made available under this heading may be used for expenses related to evaluation, training, and technical assistance: Provided further, That of the amount provided— (1) $215,000,000 is for grants to combat violence against women, as authorized by part T of the 1968 Act; (2) $35,000,000 is for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault as authorized by section 40299 of the 1994 Act; (3) $3,500,000 is for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women and related issues addressed by grant programs of the Office on Violence Against Women, which shall be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (4) $11,000,000 is for a grant program to provide services to advocate for and respond to youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance to children and youth exposed to such violence; programs to engage men and youth in preventing such violence; and assistance to middle and high school students through education and other services related to such violence: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by sections 41201, 41204, 41303, and 41305 of the 1994 Act, prior to its amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program: Provided further, That 10 percent of the total amount available for this grant program shall be available for grants under the program authorized by section 2015 of the 1968 Act: Provided further, That the definitions and grant conditions in section 40002 of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; (5) $53,000,000 is for grants to encourage arrest policies as authorized by part U of the 1968 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for a homicide reduction initiative; (6) $35,000,000 is for sexual assault victims assistance, as authorized by section 41601 of the 1994 Act; (7) $40,000,000 is for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants, as authorized by section 40295 of the 1994 Act; (8) $20,000,000 is for grants to reduce violent crimes against women on campus, as authorized by section 304 of the 2005 Act; (9) $45,000,000 is for legal assistance for victims, as authorized by section 1201 of the 2000 Act; (10) $5,000,000 is for enhanced training and services to end violence against and abuse of women in later life, as authorized by section 40802 of the 1994 Act; (11) $16,000,000 is for grants to support families in the justice system, as authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act: Provided, That unobligated balances available for the programs authorized by section 1301 of the 2000 Act and section 41002 of the 1994 Act, prior to their amendment by the 2013 Act, shall be available for this program; (12) $6,000,000 is for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities, as authorized by section 1402 of the 2000 Act; (13) $500,000 is for the National Resource Center on Workplace Responses to assist victims of domestic violence, as authorized by section 41501 of the 1994 Act; (14) $1,000,000 is for analysis and research on violence against Indian women, including as authorized by section 904 of the 2005 Act: Provided, That such funds may be transferred to “Research, Evaluation and Statistics” for administration by the Office of Justice Programs; (15) $500,000 is for a national clearinghouse that provides training and technical assistance on issues relating to sexual assault of American Indian and Alaska Native women; (16) $4,000,000 is for grants to assist tribal governments in exercising special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction, as authorized by section 904 of the 2013 Act: Provided, That the grant conditions in section 40002(b) of the 1994 Act shall apply to this program; and (17) $1,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, $90,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) $48,000,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which $5,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; and (2) $42,000,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which $4,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention. 50101); (2) $240,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and $24,800,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 10381) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (34 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed $50,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses. 527 note) shall be available for obligation in fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

For expenses necessary for the administration of immigration-related activities of the Executive Office for Immigration Review, $504,500,000, of which $4,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from the Executive Office for Immigration Review fees deposited in the “Immigration Examinations Fee” account: Provided, That not to exceed $35,000,000 of the total amount made available under this heading shall remain available until expended.

,500,000 for the purposes authorized under the 2015 Act. 11291 et seq.); the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–21); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–401); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and other programs, ,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which— (1) ,000,000 is for criminal justice statistics programs, and other activities, as authorized by part C of title I of the 1968 Act, of which ,000,000 is for a nationwide incident-based crime statistics program; and (2) ,000,000 is for research, development, and evaluation programs, and other activities as authorized by part B of title I of the 1968 Act and subtitle D of title II of the 2002 Act, of which ,000,000 is for research targeted toward developing a better understanding of the domestic radicalization phenomenon, and advancing evidence-based strategies for effective intervention and prevention. 50101); (2) 0,000,000 for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, as authorized by section 241(i)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For payments and expenses authorized under section 1001(a)(4) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, such sums as are necessary (including amounts for administrative costs), to remain available until expended; and ,800,000 for payments authorized by section 1201(b) of such Act and for educational assistance authorized by section 1218 of such Act, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for such disability and education payments, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to “Public Safety Officer Benefits” from available appropriations for the Department of Justice as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. 10381) for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers under part Q of such title notwithstanding subsection (i) of such section: Provided, That, notwithstanding section 1704(c) of such title (34 U. In addition to amounts otherwise made available in this title for official reception and representation expenses, a total of not to exceed ,000 from funds appropriated to the Department of Justice in this title shall be available to the Attorney General for official reception and representation expenses. 527 note) shall be available for obligation in fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

For expenses necessary for the administration of immigration-related activities of the Executive Office for Immigration Review, 4,500,000, of which ,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from the Executive Office for Immigration Review fees deposited in the “Immigration Examinations Fee” account: Provided, That not to exceed ,000,000 of the total amount made available under this heading shall remain available until expended.

83) and sections 431 and 442 of the Plant Protection Act (7 U. For plans, construction, repair, preventive maintenance, environmental support, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities, as authorized by 7 U. For necessary expenses for the identification, investigation, and prosecution of individuals associated with the most significant drug trafficking organizations, transnational organized crime, and money laundering organizations not otherwise provided for, to include inter-governmental agreements with State and local law enforcement agencies engaged in the investigation and prosecution of individuals involved in transnational organized crime and drug trafficking, 2,850,000, of which ,000,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided, That any amounts obligated from appropriations under this heading may be used under authorities available to the organizations reimbursed from this appropriation.

77), and any unexpended balances of funds transferred for such emergency purposes in the preceding fiscal year shall be merged with such transferred amounts: Provided further, That appropriations hereunder shall be available pursuant to law (7 U. In fiscal year 2018, the agency is authorized to collect fees to cover the total costs of providing technical assistance, goods, or services requested by States, other political subdivisions, domestic and international organizations, foreign governments, or individuals, provided that such fees are structured such that any entity's liability for such fees is reasonably based on the technical assistance, goods, or services provided to the entity by the agency, and such fees shall be reimbursed to this account, to remain available until expended, without further appropriation, for providing such assistance, goods, or services. 2250, and acquisition of land as authorized by 7 U. For necessary expenses of the Agricultural Marketing Service, 1,595,000, of which ,000,000 shall be available for the purposes of section 12306 of Public Law 113–79: Provided, That this appropriation shall be available pursuant to law (7 U. Fees may be collected for the cost of standardization activities, as established by regulation pursuant to law (31 U. For expenses necessary to carry out the activities of the National Security Division, 1,031,000, of which not to exceed ,000,000 for information technology systems shall remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 205 of this Act, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for the activities of the National Security Division, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to this heading from available appropriations for the current fiscal year for the Department of Justice, as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, That any transfer pursuant to the preceding proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section.

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For necessary expenses of the Office of the Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs, 1,000: Provided, That funds made available by this Act to an agency in the Marketing and Regulatory Programs mission area for salaries and expenses are available to fund up to one administrative support staff for the Office. 4085), 1,893,000, of which 0,000, to remain available until expended, shall be available for the control of outbreaks of insects, plant diseases, animal diseases and for control of pest animals and birds (“contingency fund”) to the extent necessary to meet emergency conditions; of which ,520,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used for the cotton pests program for cost share purposes or for debt retirement for active eradication zones; of which ,857,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for Animal Health Technical Services; of which 5,000 shall be for activities under the authority of the Horse Protection Act of 1970, as amended (15 U. For necessary expenses, to include the cost of equipment, furniture, and information technology requirements, related to construction or acquisition of buildings, facilities and sites by purchase, or as otherwise authorized by law; conversion, modification and extension of federally owned buildings; preliminary planning and design of projects; and operation and maintenance of secure work environment facilities and secure networking capabilities; 0,000,000, to remain available until expended.

1831); of which ,840,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used to support avian health; of which ,251,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for information technology infrastructure; of which 8,170,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for specialty crop pests; of which, ,326,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for field crop and rangeland ecosystem pests; of which ,523,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for zoonotic disease management; of which ,966,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for emergency preparedness and response; of which ,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for tree and wood pests; of which ,725,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the National Veterinary Stockpile; of which up to

1831); of which $62,840,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used to support avian health; of which $4,251,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for information technology infrastructure; of which $178,170,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for specialty crop pests; of which, $9,326,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for field crop and rangeland ecosystem pests; of which $16,523,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for zoonotic disease management; of which $40,966,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for emergency preparedness and response; of which $56,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for tree and wood pests; of which $5,725,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the National Veterinary Stockpile; of which up to $1,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the scrapie program for indemnities; of which $2,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the wildlife damage management program for aviation safety: Provided, That of amounts available under this heading for wildlife services methods development, $1,000,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That of amounts available under this heading for the screwworm program, $4,990,000 shall remain available until expended; of which $3,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for National Bio and Agro-Defense human capital development: Provided further, That no funds shall be used to formulate or administer a brucellosis eradication program for the current fiscal year that does not require minimum matching by the States of at least 40 percent: Provided further, That this appropriation shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed five, of which two shall be for replacement only: Provided further, That in addition, in emergencies which threaten any segment of the agricultural production industry of the United States, the Secretary may transfer from other appropriations or funds available to the agencies or corporations of the Department such sums as may be deemed necessary, to be available only in such emergencies for the arrest and eradication of contagious or infectious disease or pests of animals, poultry, or plants, and for expenses in accordance with sections 1047 of the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for detection, investigation, and prosecution of crimes against the United States, $9,030,202,000, of which not to exceed $216,900,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided, That not to exceed $184,500 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses.just happens to be packed with bdsm munches and mature submissives looking for free fetish role play hookup sex.As you're probably excited to find a kinky friend and other adult friends, get started today on our kinky personals site.Sex and dating offerings on this Charleston, South Carolina page help you hook up for hot sex quickly with sexy swingers, singles, housewives, MILFs and sluts in and around Charleston, South Carolina.This free gay dating site provides you with all those features which make searching and browsing as easy as you've always wished for. Each amount designated in this Act by the Congress for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be available (or rescinded, if applicable) only if the President subsequently so designates all such amounts and transmits such designations to the Congress. 4501) (relating to cost of living adjustments for Members of Congress) during fiscal year 2018. App.), and including not to exceed $125,000 for certain confidential operational expenses, including the payment of informants, to be expended under the direction of the Inspector General pursuant to the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law 95–452; 5 U. For necessary expenses of the Office of the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics, $800,000: Provided, That funds made available by this Act to an agency in the Research, Education, and Economics mission area for salaries and expenses are available to fund up to one administrative support staff for the Office. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 11101 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $492,000,000, to remain available until expended, which shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–324); and other programs, $1,677,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $415,500,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $10,000,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $20,000,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $15,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to states and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $16,000,000 is for emergency law enforcement assistance for events occurring during or after fiscal year 2018, as authorized by section 609M of the Justice Assistance Act of 1984 (34 U. For activities authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); and the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”), $275,500,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That any balances made available through prior year deobligations shall only be available in accordance with section 505 of this Act: Provided further, That of the amount provided under this heading— (1) $225,500,000 is for grants under section 1701 of title I of the 1968 Act (34 U. None of the funds appropriated by this title shall be available to pay for an abortion, except where the life of the mother would be endangered if the fetus were carried to term, or in the case of rape or incest: Provided, That should this prohibition be declared unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction, this section shall be null and void. 527 note) shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, except up to $40,000,000 may be obligated for implementation of a unified Department of Justice financial management system. (c) Not to exceed $10,000,000 of the excess unobligated balances available under section 524(c)(8)(E) of title 28, United States Code, shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

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1831); of which $62,840,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used to support avian health; of which $4,251,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for information technology infrastructure; of which $178,170,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for specialty crop pests; of which, $9,326,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for field crop and rangeland ecosystem pests; of which $16,523,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for zoonotic disease management; of which $40,966,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for emergency preparedness and response; of which $56,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for tree and wood pests; of which $5,725,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the National Veterinary Stockpile; of which up to $1,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the scrapie program for indemnities; of which $2,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the wildlife damage management program for aviation safety: Provided, That of amounts available under this heading for wildlife services methods development, $1,000,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That of amounts available under this heading for the screwworm program, $4,990,000 shall remain available until expended; of which $3,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for National Bio and Agro-Defense human capital development: Provided further, That no funds shall be used to formulate or administer a brucellosis eradication program for the current fiscal year that does not require minimum matching by the States of at least 40 percent: Provided further, That this appropriation shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed five, of which two shall be for replacement only: Provided further, That in addition, in emergencies which threaten any segment of the agricultural production industry of the United States, the Secretary may transfer from other appropriations or funds available to the agencies or corporations of the Department such sums as may be deemed necessary, to be available only in such emergencies for the arrest and eradication of contagious or infectious disease or pests of animals, poultry, or plants, and for expenses in accordance with sections 1047 of the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for detection, investigation, and prosecution of crimes against the United States, $9,030,202,000, of which not to exceed $216,900,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided, That not to exceed $184,500 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses.

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Each amount designated in this Act by the Congress for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be available (or rescinded, if applicable) only if the President subsequently so designates all such amounts and transmits such designations to the Congress. 4501) (relating to cost of living adjustments for Members of Congress) during fiscal year 2018. App.), and including not to exceed $125,000 for certain confidential operational expenses, including the payment of informants, to be expended under the direction of the Inspector General pursuant to the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law 95–452; 5 U. For necessary expenses of the Office of the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics, $800,000: Provided, That funds made available by this Act to an agency in the Research, Education, and Economics mission area for salaries and expenses are available to fund up to one administrative support staff for the Office. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 11101 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $492,000,000, to remain available until expended, which shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–324); and other programs, $1,677,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $415,500,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $10,000,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $20,000,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $15,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to states and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $16,000,000 is for emergency law enforcement assistance for events occurring during or after fiscal year 2018, as authorized by section 609M of the Justice Assistance Act of 1984 (34 U. For activities authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); and the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”), $275,500,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That any balances made available through prior year deobligations shall only be available in accordance with section 505 of this Act: Provided further, That of the amount provided under this heading— (1) $225,500,000 is for grants under section 1701 of title I of the 1968 Act (34 U. None of the funds appropriated by this title shall be available to pay for an abortion, except where the life of the mother would be endangered if the fetus were carried to term, or in the case of rape or incest: Provided, That should this prohibition be declared unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction, this section shall be null and void. 527 note) shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, except up to $40,000,000 may be obligated for implementation of a unified Department of Justice financial management system. (c) Not to exceed $10,000,000 of the excess unobligated balances available under section 524(c)(8)(E) of title 28, United States Code, shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the scrapie program for indemnities; of which ,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the wildlife damage management program for aviation safety: Provided, That of amounts available under this heading for wildlife services methods development,

1831); of which $62,840,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used to support avian health; of which $4,251,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for information technology infrastructure; of which $178,170,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for specialty crop pests; of which, $9,326,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for field crop and rangeland ecosystem pests; of which $16,523,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for zoonotic disease management; of which $40,966,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for emergency preparedness and response; of which $56,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for tree and wood pests; of which $5,725,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the National Veterinary Stockpile; of which up to $1,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the scrapie program for indemnities; of which $2,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the wildlife damage management program for aviation safety: Provided, That of amounts available under this heading for wildlife services methods development, $1,000,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That of amounts available under this heading for the screwworm program, $4,990,000 shall remain available until expended; of which $3,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for National Bio and Agro-Defense human capital development: Provided further, That no funds shall be used to formulate or administer a brucellosis eradication program for the current fiscal year that does not require minimum matching by the States of at least 40 percent: Provided further, That this appropriation shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed five, of which two shall be for replacement only: Provided further, That in addition, in emergencies which threaten any segment of the agricultural production industry of the United States, the Secretary may transfer from other appropriations or funds available to the agencies or corporations of the Department such sums as may be deemed necessary, to be available only in such emergencies for the arrest and eradication of contagious or infectious disease or pests of animals, poultry, or plants, and for expenses in accordance with sections 1047 of the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for detection, investigation, and prosecution of crimes against the United States, $9,030,202,000, of which not to exceed $216,900,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided, That not to exceed $184,500 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses.just happens to be packed with bdsm munches and mature submissives looking for free fetish role play hookup sex.As you're probably excited to find a kinky friend and other adult friends, get started today on our kinky personals site.Sex and dating offerings on this Charleston, South Carolina page help you hook up for hot sex quickly with sexy swingers, singles, housewives, MILFs and sluts in and around Charleston, South Carolina.This free gay dating site provides you with all those features which make searching and browsing as easy as you've always wished for. Each amount designated in this Act by the Congress for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be available (or rescinded, if applicable) only if the President subsequently so designates all such amounts and transmits such designations to the Congress. 4501) (relating to cost of living adjustments for Members of Congress) during fiscal year 2018. App.), and including not to exceed $125,000 for certain confidential operational expenses, including the payment of informants, to be expended under the direction of the Inspector General pursuant to the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law 95–452; 5 U. For necessary expenses of the Office of the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics, $800,000: Provided, That funds made available by this Act to an agency in the Research, Education, and Economics mission area for salaries and expenses are available to fund up to one administrative support staff for the Office. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 11101 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $492,000,000, to remain available until expended, which shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–324); and other programs, $1,677,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $415,500,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $10,000,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $20,000,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $15,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to states and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $16,000,000 is for emergency law enforcement assistance for events occurring during or after fiscal year 2018, as authorized by section 609M of the Justice Assistance Act of 1984 (34 U. For activities authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); and the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”), $275,500,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That any balances made available through prior year deobligations shall only be available in accordance with section 505 of this Act: Provided further, That of the amount provided under this heading— (1) $225,500,000 is for grants under section 1701 of title I of the 1968 Act (34 U. None of the funds appropriated by this title shall be available to pay for an abortion, except where the life of the mother would be endangered if the fetus were carried to term, or in the case of rape or incest: Provided, That should this prohibition be declared unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction, this section shall be null and void. 527 note) shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, except up to $40,000,000 may be obligated for implementation of a unified Department of Justice financial management system. (c) Not to exceed $10,000,000 of the excess unobligated balances available under section 524(c)(8)(E) of title 28, United States Code, shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

||

1831); of which $62,840,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used to support avian health; of which $4,251,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for information technology infrastructure; of which $178,170,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for specialty crop pests; of which, $9,326,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for field crop and rangeland ecosystem pests; of which $16,523,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for zoonotic disease management; of which $40,966,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for emergency preparedness and response; of which $56,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for tree and wood pests; of which $5,725,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the National Veterinary Stockpile; of which up to $1,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the scrapie program for indemnities; of which $2,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the wildlife damage management program for aviation safety: Provided, That of amounts available under this heading for wildlife services methods development, $1,000,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That of amounts available under this heading for the screwworm program, $4,990,000 shall remain available until expended; of which $3,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for National Bio and Agro-Defense human capital development: Provided further, That no funds shall be used to formulate or administer a brucellosis eradication program for the current fiscal year that does not require minimum matching by the States of at least 40 percent: Provided further, That this appropriation shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed five, of which two shall be for replacement only: Provided further, That in addition, in emergencies which threaten any segment of the agricultural production industry of the United States, the Secretary may transfer from other appropriations or funds available to the agencies or corporations of the Department such sums as may be deemed necessary, to be available only in such emergencies for the arrest and eradication of contagious or infectious disease or pests of animals, poultry, or plants, and for expenses in accordance with sections 1047 of the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for detection, investigation, and prosecution of crimes against the United States, $9,030,202,000, of which not to exceed $216,900,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided, That not to exceed $184,500 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses.

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Each amount designated in this Act by the Congress for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be available (or rescinded, if applicable) only if the President subsequently so designates all such amounts and transmits such designations to the Congress. 4501) (relating to cost of living adjustments for Members of Congress) during fiscal year 2018. App.), and including not to exceed $125,000 for certain confidential operational expenses, including the payment of informants, to be expended under the direction of the Inspector General pursuant to the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law 95–452; 5 U. For necessary expenses of the Office of the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics, $800,000: Provided, That funds made available by this Act to an agency in the Research, Education, and Economics mission area for salaries and expenses are available to fund up to one administrative support staff for the Office. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 11101 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $492,000,000, to remain available until expended, which shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–324); and other programs, $1,677,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $415,500,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $10,000,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $20,000,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $15,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to states and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $16,000,000 is for emergency law enforcement assistance for events occurring during or after fiscal year 2018, as authorized by section 609M of the Justice Assistance Act of 1984 (34 U. For activities authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); and the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”), $275,500,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That any balances made available through prior year deobligations shall only be available in accordance with section 505 of this Act: Provided further, That of the amount provided under this heading— (1) $225,500,000 is for grants under section 1701 of title I of the 1968 Act (34 U. None of the funds appropriated by this title shall be available to pay for an abortion, except where the life of the mother would be endangered if the fetus were carried to term, or in the case of rape or incest: Provided, That should this prohibition be declared unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction, this section shall be null and void. 527 note) shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, except up to $40,000,000 may be obligated for implementation of a unified Department of Justice financial management system. (c) Not to exceed $10,000,000 of the excess unobligated balances available under section 524(c)(8)(E) of title 28, United States Code, shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

,000,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That of amounts available under this heading for the screwworm program, ,990,000 shall remain available until expended; of which ,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for National Bio and Agro-Defense human capital development: Provided further, That no funds shall be used to formulate or administer a brucellosis eradication program for the current fiscal year that does not require minimum matching by the States of at least 40 percent: Provided further, That this appropriation shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed five, of which two shall be for replacement only: Provided further, That in addition, in emergencies which threaten any segment of the agricultural production industry of the United States, the Secretary may transfer from other appropriations or funds available to the agencies or corporations of the Department such sums as may be deemed necessary, to be available only in such emergencies for the arrest and eradication of contagious or infectious disease or pests of animals, poultry, or plants, and for expenses in accordance with sections 1047 of the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for detection, investigation, and prosecution of crimes against the United States, ,030,202,000, of which not to exceed 6,900,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided, That not to exceed 4,500 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses.

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Each amount designated in this Act by the Congress for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be available (or rescinded, if applicable) only if the President subsequently so designates all such amounts and transmits such designations to the Congress. 4501) (relating to cost of living adjustments for Members of Congress) during fiscal year 2018. App.), and including not to exceed 5,000 for certain confidential operational expenses, including the payment of informants, to be expended under the direction of the Inspector General pursuant to the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law 95–452; 5 U. For necessary expenses of the Office of the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics, 0,000: Provided, That funds made available by this Act to an agency in the Research, Education, and Economics mission area for salaries and expenses are available to fund up to one administrative support staff for the Office. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 11101 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, 2,000,000, to remain available until expended, which shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–324); and other programs,

1831); of which $62,840,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used to support avian health; of which $4,251,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for information technology infrastructure; of which $178,170,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for specialty crop pests; of which, $9,326,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for field crop and rangeland ecosystem pests; of which $16,523,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for zoonotic disease management; of which $40,966,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for emergency preparedness and response; of which $56,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for tree and wood pests; of which $5,725,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the National Veterinary Stockpile; of which up to $1,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the scrapie program for indemnities; of which $2,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the wildlife damage management program for aviation safety: Provided, That of amounts available under this heading for wildlife services methods development, $1,000,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That of amounts available under this heading for the screwworm program, $4,990,000 shall remain available until expended; of which $3,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for National Bio and Agro-Defense human capital development: Provided further, That no funds shall be used to formulate or administer a brucellosis eradication program for the current fiscal year that does not require minimum matching by the States of at least 40 percent: Provided further, That this appropriation shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed five, of which two shall be for replacement only: Provided further, That in addition, in emergencies which threaten any segment of the agricultural production industry of the United States, the Secretary may transfer from other appropriations or funds available to the agencies or corporations of the Department such sums as may be deemed necessary, to be available only in such emergencies for the arrest and eradication of contagious or infectious disease or pests of animals, poultry, or plants, and for expenses in accordance with sections 1047 of the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for detection, investigation, and prosecution of crimes against the United States, $9,030,202,000, of which not to exceed $216,900,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided, That not to exceed $184,500 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses.just happens to be packed with bdsm munches and mature submissives looking for free fetish role play hookup sex.As you're probably excited to find a kinky friend and other adult friends, get started today on our kinky personals site.Sex and dating offerings on this Charleston, South Carolina page help you hook up for hot sex quickly with sexy swingers, singles, housewives, MILFs and sluts in and around Charleston, South Carolina.This free gay dating site provides you with all those features which make searching and browsing as easy as you've always wished for. Each amount designated in this Act by the Congress for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be available (or rescinded, if applicable) only if the President subsequently so designates all such amounts and transmits such designations to the Congress. 4501) (relating to cost of living adjustments for Members of Congress) during fiscal year 2018. App.), and including not to exceed $125,000 for certain confidential operational expenses, including the payment of informants, to be expended under the direction of the Inspector General pursuant to the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law 95–452; 5 U. For necessary expenses of the Office of the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics, $800,000: Provided, That funds made available by this Act to an agency in the Research, Education, and Economics mission area for salaries and expenses are available to fund up to one administrative support staff for the Office. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 11101 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $492,000,000, to remain available until expended, which shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–324); and other programs, $1,677,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $415,500,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $10,000,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $20,000,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $15,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to states and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $16,000,000 is for emergency law enforcement assistance for events occurring during or after fiscal year 2018, as authorized by section 609M of the Justice Assistance Act of 1984 (34 U. For activities authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); and the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”), $275,500,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That any balances made available through prior year deobligations shall only be available in accordance with section 505 of this Act: Provided further, That of the amount provided under this heading— (1) $225,500,000 is for grants under section 1701 of title I of the 1968 Act (34 U. None of the funds appropriated by this title shall be available to pay for an abortion, except where the life of the mother would be endangered if the fetus were carried to term, or in the case of rape or incest: Provided, That should this prohibition be declared unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction, this section shall be null and void. 527 note) shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, except up to $40,000,000 may be obligated for implementation of a unified Department of Justice financial management system. (c) Not to exceed $10,000,000 of the excess unobligated balances available under section 524(c)(8)(E) of title 28, United States Code, shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

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1831); of which $62,840,000, to remain available until expended, shall be used to support avian health; of which $4,251,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for information technology infrastructure; of which $178,170,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for specialty crop pests; of which, $9,326,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for field crop and rangeland ecosystem pests; of which $16,523,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for zoonotic disease management; of which $40,966,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for emergency preparedness and response; of which $56,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for tree and wood pests; of which $5,725,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the National Veterinary Stockpile; of which up to $1,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the scrapie program for indemnities; of which $2,500,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for the wildlife damage management program for aviation safety: Provided, That of amounts available under this heading for wildlife services methods development, $1,000,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That of amounts available under this heading for the screwworm program, $4,990,000 shall remain available until expended; of which $3,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be for National Bio and Agro-Defense human capital development: Provided further, That no funds shall be used to formulate or administer a brucellosis eradication program for the current fiscal year that does not require minimum matching by the States of at least 40 percent: Provided further, That this appropriation shall be available for the operation and maintenance of aircraft and the purchase of not to exceed five, of which two shall be for replacement only: Provided further, That in addition, in emergencies which threaten any segment of the agricultural production industry of the United States, the Secretary may transfer from other appropriations or funds available to the agencies or corporations of the Department such sums as may be deemed necessary, to be available only in such emergencies for the arrest and eradication of contagious or infectious disease or pests of animals, poultry, or plants, and for expenses in accordance with sections 1047 of the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U. For necessary expenses of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for detection, investigation, and prosecution of crimes against the United States, $9,030,202,000, of which not to exceed $216,900,000 shall remain available until expended: Provided, That not to exceed $184,500 shall be available for official reception and representation expenses.

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Each amount designated in this Act by the Congress for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be available (or rescinded, if applicable) only if the President subsequently so designates all such amounts and transmits such designations to the Congress. 4501) (relating to cost of living adjustments for Members of Congress) during fiscal year 2018. App.), and including not to exceed $125,000 for certain confidential operational expenses, including the payment of informants, to be expended under the direction of the Inspector General pursuant to the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law 95–452; 5 U. For necessary expenses of the Office of the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics, $800,000: Provided, That funds made available by this Act to an agency in the Research, Education, and Economics mission area for salaries and expenses are available to fund up to one administrative support staff for the Office. The Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in accord with the law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation. 11101 et seq.) (“the 1974 Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386) (“the 2000 Act”); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); and the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–22) (“the 2015 Act”); and for related victims services, $492,000,000, to remain available until expended, which shall be derived by transfer from amounts available for obligation in this Act from the Fund established by section 1402 of chapter XIV of title II of Public Law 98–473 (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (“the 1974 Act”); the Missing Children's Assistance Act (34 U. For grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and other assistance authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322) (“the 1994 Act”); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); the Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–405); the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–647) (“the 1990 Act”); the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–164); the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”); the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109–248) (“the Adam Walsh Act”); the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–386); the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–180); subtitle D of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107–296) (“the 2002 Act”); the Second Chance Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–199); the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–403); the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (Public Law 98–473); the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Reauthorization and Improvement Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–416); the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113–4) (“the 2013 Act”); the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–198) (“CARA”); the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114–324); and other programs, $1,677,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) $415,500,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, $10,000,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), $5,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, $2,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, $2,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, $2,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, $20,000,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, $2,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, $15,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to states and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and $16,000,000 is for emergency law enforcement assistance for events occurring during or after fiscal year 2018, as authorized by section 609M of the Justice Assistance Act of 1984 (34 U. For activities authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); and the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”), $275,500,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That any balances made available through prior year deobligations shall only be available in accordance with section 505 of this Act: Provided further, That of the amount provided under this heading— (1) $225,500,000 is for grants under section 1701 of title I of the 1968 Act (34 U. None of the funds appropriated by this title shall be available to pay for an abortion, except where the life of the mother would be endangered if the fetus were carried to term, or in the case of rape or incest: Provided, That should this prohibition be declared unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction, this section shall be null and void. 527 note) shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, except up to $40,000,000 may be obligated for implementation of a unified Department of Justice financial management system. (c) Not to exceed $10,000,000 of the excess unobligated balances available under section 524(c)(8)(E) of title 28, United States Code, shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.

,677,500,000, to remain available until expended as follows— (1) 5,500,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program as authorized by subpart 1 of part E of title I of the 1968 Act (except that section 1001(c), and the special rules for Puerto Rico under section 505(g) of title I of the 1968 Act shall not apply for purposes of this Act), of which, notwithstanding such subpart 1, ,000,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR), ,000,000 is for an initiative to support evidence-based policing, ,500,000 is for an initiative to enhance prosecutorial decision-making, ,400,000 is for the operationalization, maintenance and expansion of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, ,500,000 is for a national training initiative to improve police-based responses to people with mental illness or developmental disabilities, ,000,000 is for competitive and evidence-based programs to reduce gun crime and gang violence, ,000,000 is for a student loan repayment assistance program pursuant to section 952 of Public Law 110–315, ,500,000 is for prison rape prevention and prosecution grants to states and units of local government, and other programs, as authorized by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108–79), and ,000,000 is for emergency law enforcement assistance for events occurring during or after fiscal year 2018, as authorized by section 609M of the Justice Assistance Act of 1984 (34 U. For activities authorized by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103–322); the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“the 1968 Act”); and the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–162) (“the 2005 Act”), 5,500,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That any balances made available through prior year deobligations shall only be available in accordance with section 505 of this Act: Provided further, That of the amount provided under this heading— (1) 5,500,000 is for grants under section 1701 of title I of the 1968 Act (34 U. None of the funds appropriated by this title shall be available to pay for an abortion, except where the life of the mother would be endangered if the fetus were carried to term, or in the case of rape or incest: Provided, That should this prohibition be declared unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction, this section shall be null and void. 527 note) shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, except up to ,000,000 may be obligated for implementation of a unified Department of Justice financial management system. (c) Not to exceed ,000,000 of the excess unobligated balances available under section 524(c)(8)(E) of title 28, United States Code, shall be available for obligation during fiscal year 2018, and any use, obligation, transfer or allocation of such funds shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act.